spaceexp
explorationimages:

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter: Before & after photos of a new crater on the moon.

 On 11 September 2013 the “Moon Impacts Detection and Analysis System” (MIDAS) camera captured a bright 8-second long flash on the central nearside of the Moon. This was the brightest event captured so far by the MIDAS team, and they estimated that the crater should be between 46 and 56 meters in diameter. The LROC team targeted the reported coordinates (17.2°S, 339.5°E) of the flash and acquired several images over a few months until the crater was found on 13 April 2014! Fortunately there was a NAC image of the target area acquired before the impact, so finding the new crater was relatively easy once an “after” image with comparable lighting to the “before” image was acquired. As it turns out the new crater is ~34 meters (112 feet) in diameter and is located at 17.167°S, 339.559°E, only 3 kilometers (1.9 miles) from the original telescope-based prediction. In the before-after animation you can see ejecta effects from the crater extend out more than 500 meters in all directions!

explorationimages:

Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter: Before & after photos of a new crater on the moon.

On 11 September 2013 the “Moon Impacts Detection and Analysis System” (MIDAS) camera captured a bright 8-second long flash on the central nearside of the Moon. This was the brightest event captured so far by the MIDAS team, and they estimated that the crater should be between 46 and 56 meters in diameter. The LROC team targeted the reported coordinates (17.2°S, 339.5°E) of the flash and acquired several images over a few months until the crater was found on 13 April 2014!

Fortunately there was a NAC image of the target area acquired before the impact, so finding the new crater was relatively easy once an “after” image with comparable lighting to the “before” image was acquired. As it turns out the new crater is ~34 meters (112 feet) in diameter and is located at 17.167°S, 339.559°E, only 3 kilometers (1.9 miles) from the original telescope-based prediction. In the before-after animation you can see ejecta effects from the crater extend out more than 500 meters in all directions!
spaceexp
explorationimages:

Rosetta: 3D anaglyph of the prime landing site chosen for the Philae lander.

 This anaglyph image of Philae’s primary landing site on the ‘head’ of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko can be viewed using stereoscopic glasses with red–green/blue filters. The two images used to make the anaglyph were taken on 26 August 2014 from a distance of 48 km with Rosetta’s OSIRIS narrow-angle camera. The image scale is 0.96 metres/pixel. The primary landing location, Site J, was selected during the Landing Site Selection Group meeting held 13–14 September 2014. Full story: 'J' marks the spot for Rosetta's lander 

Credits: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA

explorationimages:

Rosetta: 3D anaglyph of the prime landing site chosen for the Philae lander.

This anaglyph image of Philae’s primary landing site on the ‘head’ of Comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko can be viewed using stereoscopic glasses with red–green/blue filters.

The two images used to make the anaglyph were taken on 26 August 2014 from a distance of 48 km with Rosetta’s OSIRIS narrow-angle camera. The image scale is 0.96 metres/pixel.

The primary landing location, Site J, was selected during the Landing Site Selection Group meeting held 13–14 September 2014.

Full story: 'J' marks the spot for Rosetta's lander
Credits: ESA/Rosetta/MPS for OSIRIS Team MPS/UPD/LAM/IAA/SSO/INTA/UPM/DASP/IDA